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Adverse side effects of viagra a former top environmental official in pennsylvania is warning maryland lawmakers to tread carefully before opening portions of the state to for natural gas. According to The Baltimore Sun, John Quigley, the former head of Pennsylvania's Dept. of Conservation of Natural Resources, told Maryland officials this week to "take a deep breath" when it comes to fracking in the western areas of the state. Like Pennsylvania, parts of Maryland's western reaches cover the coveted Marcellus Shale formation, which is worth about $3 trillion [adverse side effects of viagra] in natural gas reserves. To get that gas, energy companies must employ the controversial fracking process - literally injecting hundreds of thousands of gallons of toxic liquid with a drill - to capture the gas inside the rock. Allowing fracking could mean much-needed revenues for the state, and will likely see a rise in jobs in that industry, but it also carries some costly short- and long-term effects. We've reported almost daily on the dangers posed by fracking for natural gas adverse side effects of viagra, namely the likelihood of water contamination near fracking wells. It's happened numerous times across Pennsylvania and some families have decided to hold the energy companies accountable if the state and federal governments won't. Fracking companies are exempt from disclosing what exactly is in its drilling fluid. At least five dozen of hundreds of chemicals are known toxins. Pennsylvania has the most lax regulations against fracking and drilling companies are taking advantage, but leaving adverse side effects of viagra a trail of contamination behind them.


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